38 Seymour Street

Portman Square, London

38: Seymour Street is owned by Portman Estates. During the recent refurbishment of the Grade II building, in collaboration with Timorous

Beasties, a highly bespoke interior has been created. As London expanded westwards in the 18th century plane trees were introduced to London and the design provides a strong visual connection between the Estate, the square and

the traditional London tree. The unique interior, based on London plane trees links parts of the building to the history of Portman Square, Portman Estates and the surrounding area.

 

The walls and desk of the reception area feature bespoke abstract patterns based on the bark and fruit of the London plane tree. The artwork was created from photographs of London plane trees and was translated into textures by Graphic Relief. The surfaces are designed so they change as the light changes throughput the day.

The panels behind the reception desk are ‘bronze’ concrete produced using a blend of cement and powdered bronze which is cast and polished to give a metallic effect.

 

 

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38 Seymour Street - read more

38 Seymour Street

Portman Square, London

38 Seymour Street is owned by Portman Estates. During the recent refurbishment of the Grade II building, in collaboration with Timorous Beasties, a highly bespoke interior has been created. As London expanded westwards in the 18th century plane trees were introduced to London and the design provides a strong visual connection between the Estate, the square and the traditional London tree. The unique interior, based on London plane trees links parts of the building to the history of Portman Square, Portman Estates and the surrounding area.

 

The walls and desk of the reception area feature bespoke abstract patterns based on the bark and fruit of the London plane tree. The artwork was created from photographs of London plane trees and was translated into textures by Graphic Relief. The textured concrete represent the look and feel of the bark, leaves and fruit of the plane tree and the surfaces are designed so they change as the light changes throughput the day.

The panels behind the reception desk are ‘bronze’ concrete produced using a blend of cement and powdered bronze which is cast and polished to give a metallic effect..

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